Dateline online dating scam

In 2016, 4100 Australians contacted the ACCC’s Scamwatch service to report dating and romance scams and more than million was lost: the largest amount of money lost to any type of scam.Stats also show Facebook is a popular contact method used by romance scammers, and that those aged 45 and over are most likely to be affected.I really like your profile and I like what I have gotten to know about you so far.I would love to get to know you as you sound like a very interesting person plus you are beautiful. In fact it would be my pleasure if you wrote me at my email as I hardly come on here often. Some of the other men she'd met on Match had also quickly offered personal email addresses, so Amy didn't sense anything unusual when she wrote back to the Yahoo address from her own account.She had a website for her business, was on Facebook, carried a smartphone.But who knew exactly how these online dating services worked?Then she saw this guy, the one with a mysterious profile name — darkandsugarclue.The photo showed a trim, silver-haired man of 61 with a salt-and-pepper beard and Wayfarer-style shades. And something else: He was a "100% match." Whoever he was, the computer had decided he was the one. Then, this message appeared when she logged on to her account. Thank you so much for the email and I am really sorry for the delay in reply, I don't come on here often, smiles ...

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She resolved to be pickier, only contacting men who were closely matched — 90 percent or more, as determined by the algorithm pulling the strings behind her online search. Back in college, she'd studied computer science and psychology, and she considered herself pretty tech-savvy.

Two sharp blows that had left her alone in her late 50s. His cancer took him swiftly, before she had time to process what was happening.

It had been over two years since the death of her husband of 20 years; four, since she had lost her mother.

After gaining your trust – often waiting weeks, months or even years – they tell you an elaborate story involving some crisis, or plan to travel to see you and ask for money, gifts or your bank account/credit card details.” “This is a scammer’s end-game: to abuse your trust so they can steal your money.

Don’t fall for their con – look after yourself when online and don’t be afraid to cut off contact if something doesn’t feel right to you,” Ms Rickard said.