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The Oregon Lumber Company built a large while hotel at the side of the track close to the mill.There was a dance hall near the hotel, (later a truck barn was built on the sight of the dance hall, after it had burned down), where many dances were attended by all.Over the years as the industry progressed, much of the work done by the railroad was gradually replaced by trucks that hauled the logs. The trucks hauled more and more and the railroad less and less, until about 19 the last rails were pulled up. If I can find my copies I will send them to you to post. The old maps of the area show the site of Austin as "Newton's."It appears that Mr. Over time she paid off the bank loan and took full possession of the Austin property. when I was a kid working for Henry Ricco in the mid-1950s, Henry told me a story told to him by 'Doc' Edwards -- Linda Austin's brother. Henry Ricco, who bought the Austin place from 'Doc' Edwards after Linda died, found her wedding ring rolled up in a sock inside a shoe in her bedroom.Or, if someone else is interested, they can find them at the Grant County Courthouse. Doc had moved in with Linda to help her, but it was probably the other way around. It was one thing Doc was unable to "borrow."In any case, Minot apparently wrote Linda that he wanted to come back and would be on a particular stage.The buildings had false fronts (there was still one these false fronted buildings standing as late as 1997). The railroad facilities included a four-stall engine house, yard trackage and a water tank.

The passenger trains from Baker stopped at the Austin House (Austin Station) for lunch which Ma Austin served at her board house.

* (In about 1917 the Oregon Lumber Company built a new double-sided sawmill about a mile down the Middle Fork of the John Day River from Austin.

A company owned town was built for the mill workers and was named Batesville. This mill remained in full operation until October 1975, when a new mill was put into operation in John Day by Edward Hines Lumber Company, the owners at that time.

In the beginning, the rails stopped at the former stagecoach stop of Austin Station.

A large sawmill owned by Oregon Lumber Company was built beside the tracks at Austin.