Parents and dating violence

The 2013 national Youth Risk Behavior Survey found approximately 10% of high school students reported physical victimization and 10% reported sexual victimization from a dating partner in the 12 months* before they were surveyed. Teens receive messages about how to behave in relationships from peers, adults in their lives, and the media. Risks of having unhealthy relationships increase for teens who: Dating violence can be prevented when teens, families, organizations, and communities work together to implement effective prevention strategies.

All too often these examples suggest that violence in a relationship is normal, but violence is never acceptable.

Many teens do not report it because they are afraid to tell friends and family. Youth who experience dating violence are more likely to experience the following: Additionally, youth who are victims of dating violence in high school are at higher risk for victimization during college.

You will get answers if you set up a comfortable environment and listen respectfully.Unhealthy relationships can start early and last a lifetime.Teens often think some behaviors, like teasing and name-calling, are a “normal” part of a relationship.Never tell your teen you want to talk in from of other people, except perhaps your child's other parent or guardian.Take your child out to a coffee shop or for a drive, away from siblings and distractions for both of you.