The dating room in nyc do more men or women do online dating

The Republican presidential hopeful’s penthouse is located on Fifth Avenue within the iconic Trump Tower, and spans three floors, each decked out with floor-to-ceiling marble-and-gold pillars and oversized paintings featuring scenes from Greek myths.PHOTOS: Donald Trump's former flames The Donald, 69, also has crystal chandeliers, and cushioned sofas and chairs throughout his living room, with Greek vases on the mantelpiece.Since these areas are basically married, it makes sense to treat them as a single statistical area, right? It’s what Chelsea once was.” As for the one on the bottom, I spend a lot of time down under side of the Manhattan bridge, and while it looks like the Lower East Side I can tell you this: all of those single men are living in Chinatown.The ones that include NYC also claim some New Jersey, maybe a little Pennsylvania, Long Island, etc. Let’s hop across the East River for a moment – in the 20-34 range up above, Williamsburg has a few more men and Greenpoint has a few more ladies, but if we adjust down to 20-29 the picture changes a wee bit. Hip, single, straight, female twentysomethings: you are doomed. Going back to the Chinatown-makes-Lower-Manhattan-blue observation, let’s examine the Outer Boroughs to see if we can find a trend…

Jim Parsons has wed beau of 14 years, Todd Spiewak.PHOTOS: Celebrities' political affiliations Case in point: Trump’s sitting room is reminiscent of the French monarch’s historic Hall of Mirrors in Versailles, which features chandeliers, gold statues, and a ceiling painted with scenes of his military victories.For the past half-dozen years I’ve been fighting an easily-mapped battle about the shortage of eligible bachelors in New York City.If you just can’t wait, here’s a sneak preview: our arch-nemesis Silicon Valley is looking blue as the sky.Jonathan Soma is a Brooklyn based data wrangler who teaches everything from Thai cooking to the Loch Ness monster at the Brooklyn Brainery and runs a data code narrative program at Columbia’s Journalism School.