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Oppositions to sex tourism also stem from concerns around the trafficking of women.

The United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime targets the trafficking of women and children as a central concern in their approach to transnational crime.

These economic reinforcements are part of the reason sex tourism continues to exist.

Sex work yields higher wages than work in the formal sector, and remittances from a relative in the sex industry allows poor families (especially in rural areas) to achieve a much higher quality of life.

Conversely, in receiving countries such as Cambodia, commercial sex work is generally accepted as a common behavior for men, and sex with minors is often accepted as well.

Lawmakers as well as law enforcement often do not place priority on policing prostitution and sex trafficking.

Prostitutes have had to register as independent workers with the Chamber of Commerce and pay income tax to legally perform their work since 2000.

By decriminalizing prostitution, a government can protect sex workers under labor laws accessible by workers in other fields.

However, social problems arise when particular countries or cities acquire a reputation as a destination or become attractive for sex tourism.

The people in these communities are generally aware of what they are committing their children to, but consider the rewards of increased financial return to be greater than the consequence for their children.

Men who travel seeking to pay for sex may do so because it is much harder to engage in sex work in their home countries.

Sex tourism is travel to engage in sexual activity, particularly with prostitutes.

The World Tourism Organization, a specialized agency of the United Nations, defines sex tourism as "trips organized from within the tourism sector, or from outside this sector but using its structures and networks, with the primary purpose of effecting a commercial sexual relationship by the tourist with residents at the destination".